What is an Integrative and Functional Dietitian?

Feb 26, 2021 | Mind-Body

Integrative and functional dietitians passionately believe in a holistic approach to health and wellbeing. We view the body as an ecosystem, not a collection of parts. We treat the organism, not just organs, and the system, not just the symptoms.

“Health is not just the absence of disease but a state of optimum vitality.”

— Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine

Integrative and functional dietitians spend time really getting to know their clients and take everything into consideration. By understanding the complexity of an individual and using functional labs to dig deeper than conventional tests, we are able to determine and address the root cause of disease. Our approach centers on resolving these core imbalances and restoring foundational health so you can grow old without feeling older.

Educating on how and why certain foods transform health is central to our mission. When your energy is running low (fatigue) or your body is breaking down (aches and pains), something is missing. And it usually comes down to what you put in (or fail to put in) your mouth. The foods and beverages you consume have a profound impact on your health. 

The food you eat can be either the safest and most powerful form of medicine or the slowest form of poison. — Dr. Ann Wigmore, ND

In addition to whole foods, integrative and functional dietitians integrate a variety of nutrition therapies in clinical practice — including functional testing, tailored supplements, and mind-body modalities — creating personalized plans that provide you with optimal results in the shortest amount of time.

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